Rules of Engagement: Using Personal Technologies to Motivate Rather Than Distract

Are student devices - laptops, netbooks, smartphones and tablets - distracting your students? Or are you using them to motivate and engage? Some simple rules can help you make the most of these devices that are increasingly common in the classroom.
This one hour presentation/discussion examines the difference between entertainment and engagement and describes five strategies for dealing with "distractive" technologies in the classroom with concrete examples of how personally owned devices can be used to both enhance traditional educational practices and to completely restructure learning.

PowerPoint slides (shared DropBox link)

GoSoapBox link
The Technology Upgrade

This one hour presentation/discussion:
  • Examines the difference between entertainment and engagement
  • Describes five strategies for dealing with "distractive" technologies in the classroom with concrete examples of how personally owned devices can be used to both enhance traditional educational practices and to completely restructure learning
  • Shows practical examples of using technology for formative assessment, collaborative work, and differentiation of instruction in the classroom.

Related articles by Doug Johnson:

Mankato Area Public School's BYOD resource page
Edina Public School's "Classroom Management Resources" for it BYOD project
Fairfax County Public Schools RECOMMENDED BEST PRACTICES FOR PERSONALLY OWNED COMPUTING/NETWORK DEVICES fairfaxBYOD.pdf
Neilson, L. 7 Myths of BYOD Debunked, T.H.E. Journal, November 11, 2011.
Robinson, J. Lessons from Our One-Year Experiment with BYOT
Valenza, J. Infotention and digital citizenship
West, M. Making the Case for Mobile Tech. Expansion, Education Week Digital Directions, June 13, 2012
Wolpert-Gawron, Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement, Edutopia, April 28, 2012